Dependence on God: A Reflection for the First Week of Lent


By Hannah Schultz

READING: FROM THE GOSPEL OF MATTHEW, CHAPTER 6, VERSE 25-27, 31-34: 

“Therefore I tell you, do not worry about your life, what you will eat or what you will drink, or about your body, what you will wear. Is not life more than food, and the body more than clothing? Look at the birds of the sky; they neither sow nor reap nor gather into barns, and yet your heavenly Father feeds them. Are you not of more value than they? And can any of you by worrying add a single hour to your span of life? So do not worry and say, ‘What are we to eat?’ or ‘What are we to drink?’ or ‘What are we to wear?’ All these things the pagans seek. Your heavenly Father knows that you need them all. But strive first for the kingdom of God and his righteousness, and all these things will be given to you as well. So do not worry about tomorrow, for tomorrow will bring worried of its own. Today’s trouble is enough for today.”


REFLECTION:

I think it’s safe to say that college is a very stressful, albeit amazing, experience. Between the exams, the papers, time management, thinking about the future, and building up a resume, there seems to be little time to devote to God but an abundance of time to worry and an abundance of stressors to cause anxiety. Each of these moments of uncertainty and tribulation offer the opportunity for us to strengthen our relationship with God. In times when you have a very important exam looming, or a lengthy paper due soon that counts for 25% of your grade, give your best effort and leave the rest to God. When you have done all that you physically and mentally can, the only thing left to do is put your future in God’s hands. God already has a plan for you, so daunting, life-changing tasks are put in your life for a reason; whether that be to help you grow, to realize your reliance on Christ, or to discover hidden abilities. God knows you have the strength to persevere and overcome the challenges.

God already knows what your future holds, so why worry? This saying has become a cliché but you only live this day once. Each day is important to becoming who God wants you to become. However, there is nothing you can do today, other than prepare, to influence the outcome of tomorrow. God already knows what will occur, and through each experience, your life falls more and more into place. So then again, why worry about tomorrow? Everything on earth is arbitrary anyways; what matters after this life is the Kingdom of God, and how we lived out our faith on earth. We can grow closer to God and strengthen our relationship with him by continually placing our worries and anxieties in God’s hands, giving him our complete trust.


LOOKING AHEAD:

Next time you are worried about an exam or a paper, do all you can and then put the rest of the future in God’s hands.

  • Do I thank God enough for every person, opportunity, and experience I have in my life?

  • Where is my relationship with God now and where do I want it to be? How can I get there?

  • Am I living out each day to the fullest, or do I spend it worrying about things out of my control

Throughout the season of Lent, members of the CBU community will offer weekly reflections in order to prepare our hearts and minds for the Easter celebration in 40 days. Reflections will be posted each Monday during Lent on the various university social media platforms. Please email cbuministry@cbu.edu with any feedback.


Hannah Schultz is a sophomore Mathematics major with minors in Biology and Global Studies

Posted by Josh Colfer at 2:41 PM

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